Our Positions

The cultural and political landscape is constantly shifting. Be sure to read our position papers to learn just where PHCC stands.

For more information or questions, email government@naphcc.org.

Published March 2003

Experience has demonstrated that the most practical and sound method of preparing workers for employment in skilled occupations is through planned apprenticeship–a training concept which provides for employment and training under actual job conditions supervised by skilled journey workers and at wages commensurate with the apprentice’s skill. In addition, the apprentice’s knowledge and understanding of the occupation is enhanced through participation in approved courses of related and supplemental instruction.

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Published March 2002

Association Health Plans (AHPs) are market-oriented mechanisms that empower small entrepreneurs with the same “pooling” tools which large employers use to make health coverage affordable for their workers. AHPs can reduce health insurance costs 15% 30% by allowing small businesses to “pool” together to obtain the same economies of scale, purchasing clout and administrative efficiencies now available to employees in large employer plans.

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Published October 2000

The Davis-Bacon Act, signed into law in 1931, requires contractors doing government construction work to pay the “prevailing wage” generally equivalent to the union wage rate. Continuing efforts in Congress to make changes in the Davis-Bacon Act sharply divide the interests of union and open shop contractors.

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Published October 2000

There are currently ten to twelve million privately-held businesses in the United States. These businesses account for 50% of the GNP, 50% of all jobs, and 65% of U.S. wages paid. The Small Business Administration states that small business accounts for nearly two-thirds of the net new jobs in the economy.

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Published October 2000

PHCC-National Association believes that unreasonably high CAFE standards have already raised automobile and light truck costs, limited consumer choice of vehicles and reduced highway safety without achieving the anticipated environmental and energy efficiency benefits expected.

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Published June 2018

The construction industry is heavily dependent on immigrant labor.  The percentage of immigrant workers in the construction workforce is rising, according to an analysis of the most recent 2016 American Community Survey data by the National Association of Home Builders’ Housing Economics. Immigrant workers comprise nearly 25% of the overall construction workforce and accounting for an average of 30% in the construction trades.

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